Last edited by Togul
Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature, Volume 2 found in the catalog.

The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature, Volume 2

A Psychohistorical Perspective

by Menachem M. Brayer

  • 16 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Ktav Pub Inc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Jewish Religious Texts,
  • Jewish women,
  • Women And The Church,
  • History,
  • Psychology,
  • Women in rabbinical literature

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages285
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8172537M
    ISBN 100881250732
    ISBN 109780881250732

    In “The Jewish Annotated New Testament,” Amy-Jill Levine, of Vanderbilt Divinity School and author of the book “The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus,” has teamed up with Marc Zvi Brettler, a professor of Bible at Brandeis University, to reclaim the New Testament as an integral part of Jewish literature.   The Literature of the Jewish People in the Period of the Second Temple and the Talmud, Volume 3: The Literature of the Sages Second Part: Midrash and Targum; Liturgy, Poetry, Mysticism; Contracts, Inscriptions, Ancient Science; and the Languages of Rabbinic Literature Series: Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum, Volume: 2/3/2Cited by: 3.

    Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychohistorical Perspective by Menachem M. Brayer (Trade Paper) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! In Answering Jewish Objections to Jesus, volume 2, Michael Brown provides real answers to twenty-eight theological objections. He treats these objections seriously and fairly, building answers from the often surprising teachings in Rabbinic literature and the Hebrew Scriptures/5(39).

    The Talmud of Relationships amply demonstrates that talmudic/rabbinic literature retains its power to speak to the spiritual issues we face individually and communally, even more than a millennium and a half later.” – Gail Labovitz, Associate Professor of Rabbinic Literature, Ziegler School of Rabbinic . Hasidism—a spiritual revival movement associated with the founding figure of Israel Ba’al Shem Tov (Besht, c. –), which began in Poland in the second half of the eighteenth century and became a mass movement of Eastern European Jewry by the early decades of the nineteenth—has been celebrated as nothing less than a “feminist” revolution in early modern Judaism.


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The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature, Volume 2 by Menachem M. Brayer Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychohistorical Perspective by Menachem M. Brayer (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Format: Paperback. Jewish Women in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychosocial Perspective by Menachem M.

Brayer (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. Format: Paperback. In this creative book, Raveh uses a wide range of modern theories, including gender theory and feminist psychology, to show the complex and diverse ways in which the rabbinic sages rework stories about women.

Tova Hartman" Those versed in feminist theory will have the easiest time reading Feminist Rereadings of Rabbinic by: 1. The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychohistorical Perspective vol. 2 - Jewish Used Books is a Used Book Store offering Discount Book Prices.

The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychohistorical Perspective vol. 1 - Jewish Used Books is a Used Book Store offering Discount Book Prices. While most gender-based analyses of rabbinic Judaism concentrate on the status of women in the halakhah (the rabbinic legal tradition), Judith R.

Baskin turns her attention to the construction of women in the aggadic midrash, a collection of expansions of the biblical text, rabbinic ruminations, and homiletical discourses that constitutes the non-legal component of rabbinic literature.

Examining rabbinic convictions Cited by: Menachem M. Brayer is the author of The Jewish Woman In Rabbinic Literature ( avg rating, 1 rating, 0 reviews), The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literatu 4/5(2). The Jewish Woman in Rabbinic Literature, Volume 2: A Psychohistorical Perspective by Brayer, Menachem M.

() Hardcover Jewish Women in Rabbinic Literature: A Psychosocial Perspective by Menachem M. Brayer () Paperback. Rabbinic literature is a religious textual compendium developed over the history of the Jewish people, particularly in the Second Temple period and afterward.

The rabbis designated their literature the Oral Torah, as opposed to the finalized canon of the Written Torah. While the Torah refers mainly to the five books of Moses, it also refers.

RABBINICAL LITERATURE, a modern scientific term used to describe the literature of halakhah which is based upon the Oral Law, its traditions and methodology in its different periods, its changing languages, and its varied forms.

This definition excludes from its purview such sacred literature as liturgy, piyyutim, and other liturgical compositions, pure Kabbalah works, philosophical bible.

The Literature of the Jewish People in the Period of the Second Temple and the Talmud, Volume 3: The Literature of the Sages Second Part: Midrash and Targum; Liturgy, Poetry, Mysticism; Contracts, Inscriptions, Ancient Science; and the Languages of Rabbinic Literature Series: Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum, Volume: 2/3/2Author: Mordechai A.

Friedman. The idea that a woman's place is in the home is clearly espoused in rabbinic literature. A major duty envisioned by the Rabbis for the woman at home was the raising of children, particularly when they were very young and dependent on her for sustenance.

The rabbinic imagination envisioned the working woman primarily at her spindle or : Tal Ilan. This long-awaited companion volume to The Literature of the Sages, First Part (Fortress Press, ) brings to completion Section II of the renowned Compendia series. The Literature of the Sages, Second Part, explores the literary creation of thousands of ancient Jewish teachers, the often- anonymous Sages of late antiquity and the Middle Ages.

The Early Judaism and Its Literature (EJL) series publishes works on the history, culture, and literature of Second Temple Judaism, including Hellenistic Jewish authors, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and Jewish apocrypha and pseudepigrapha.

Work on rabbinic literature that deals with Second Temple Judaism will also be considered. Oqimta is an online journal in the field of classical rabbinic literature (Tannaitic and Amoraic literature).

It also invites contributions on other aspects of late ancient Jewish culture and history (e.g., piyyut, magical texts, art, inscriptions), as well as on the reception of rabbinic literature in the medieval and modern : Rachel Ariel.

The Literature of the Jewish People in the Period of the Second Temple and the Talmud, Volume 3: The Literature of the Sages Second Part: Midrash and Targum; Liturgy, Poetry, Mysticism; Contracts, Inscriptions, Ancient Science; and the Languages of Rabbinic Literature Series: Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum, Volume: 2/3/2.

The Hebrew Bible is a composite document containing a variety of types of literature, reflecting the attitudes and concerns of numerous authors writing in very different times and places.

An example of such significant diversity as it applies to women is evident in the two creation stories placed at Author: Judith Baskin. Women in the Bible, Qumran and Early Rabbinic Literature begins with an objective interpretation of the biblical narratives of the Creation and the Fall, the intellectual basis of Jewish attitudes toward women, and then analyzes the divergent interpretations of Qumran and the Rabbis, the grounds of their distinct doctrines and halakhot.

The role of women in Judaism is determined by the Hebrew Bible, the Oral Law (the corpus of rabbinic literature), by custom, and by cultural factors. Although the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic literature mention various female role models, religious law treats women differently in various circumstances.

The entire body of rabbinic literature (including Jewish liturgy) chronicles the attachment of the ancient rabbis to the Land of Israel. These texts are moving, engaging, and eventually set the stage for the modern return to the Land.

The rabbinic view of the Land. Rabbinic Judaism constructed differing legal, religious, and social roles for men and women that were intended to foster women’s reproductive functions and nurturing qualities, even as it placed them under the control of a dominant childlessness was perceived as a grave misfortune for both men and women, a male’s failure to generate offspring violated a legal obligation."Meet the Rabbis" explains to the reader how rabbinic thought was relevant to Jesus and the New Testament world, and hence should be relevant to those people today who read the New Testament.

In this sense, Rabbinic thought is relevant to every aspect of modern life. Rabbinic literature explores the meaning of living life to its fullest, in right relationship with God and humanity.4/5(9).This volume describes that part of the rich literary production of ancient Judaism which was not contained in the Hebrew Bible nor in rabbinic literature.

These writings originated in the Second Temple period, which proved highly creative in the midst of strong external influences and internal example are the Dead Sea Scrolls, documents of an extremely separatist sect.